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Thursday, May 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest found in the catalog.

Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest

Martin F Jurgensen

Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest

by Martin F Jurgensen

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  • 8 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soils -- Nitrogen content,
  • Prescribed burning,
  • Forest soils,
  • Forest site quality

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMartin F. Jurgensen, Alan E. Harvey, and Michael J. Larsen
    SeriesResearch paper INT -- 275
    ContributionsHarvey, A. E, Larsen, Michael J, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13604209M

    For example, in a study of a boreal forest fire in Canada by Randerson et al. (), analysis showed that when all the integrating effects of the fire (e.g. greenhouse gases, aerosols, carbon deposition on snow and sea ice, and post-fire changes in surface albedo) are accounted for, a decrease in radiative energy is expected when the fire. • Other forest-management issues, including fire suppression, prescribed fire, and recreation. • Loss of riparian forest and shrub. • Urban and residential development, especially in oak, chaparral, and coastal scrub habitats. • Forest health, especially in pine forest and oak woodlands. • Loss and contamination of freshwater wetlands.

    Current practice is to base fertilization levels on soil analyses of individual orchards. Typical fertilization prescriptions for seed orchards of southern pines have been annual application of about kg/ha of nitrogen, 80 kg/ha of potassium, 40 kg/ha of phosphorus, and 50 kg/ha of magnesium (Zobel and Talbert ).5/5(1). hover for 1st page - National Wildland Fire Training.

    Abstract— Recent evidence suggests that soils of some central Appalachian hardwood forests have become nitrogen (N) saturated, a condition that develops when availability of soil N exceeds demand for N by plant roots and soil microbes. Among many environmental concerns associated with N saturation are the following: (1) greatly altered N cycle seen as a de-coupling of N . No category; Wildland Fire in Ecosystems Effects of Fire on Flora.


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Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest by Martin F Jurgensen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest / Related Titles. Series: Research paper INT ; By.

Jurgensen, Martin F. Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest by Jurgensen, Martin F. cn; Harvey, A. cn; Larsen, Michael J. cn; Forestry Sciences Laboratory (Missoula, Mont.) 1n. Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest.

[Ogden, Utah]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type.

Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest. [Ogden, Utah]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type.

1. Introduction. Forest soil scientists have long been concerned with soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) because these are often the master variables determining soil fertility (Pritchett and Fisher, ).In recent decades, knowledge of the role of soils as a source or sink for C on a global scale has become vital for assessing of changes in atmospheric CO 2 Cited by: forest floor carbon and nitrogen loss due to prescribed fire Fig.

Plot of least-squares linear regressions for C (a) and N (b) as a function of Ca content for Sawtooth, Marlene, and Spooner. Jurgensen, M. Harvey, and M. Larsen. Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western larch forest. USDA Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Research Paper INT Macadam, A.

Effects of prescribed fire on forest soils. The effects of an August,wildfire on nutrient losses by water erosion have been studied.

The fire affected an area of ha of pine forest and. Effects of Prescribed Fire on Soil Nitrogen Levels in a Cutover Douglas-fir/Western Larch Forest (PDF - MB). Research Paper INT Febru Link to San Dimas Technology and Development Center was added to the.

Fire spread in 1-year-old grand fir slash is slower than fire spread in 1-year-old slash of all associated conifers except western larch, in which fire spread is similar.

Photo guides have been prepared for appraising slash fuels in grand fir forests of northern Idaho, and for downed woody fuels in grand fir, western larch, and Douglas-fir. Prescribed fire or partial cutting and prescribed fire can be used to create parklike openings underneath mature stands of ponderosa pine in which campgrounds and picnic areas can be installed.

Periodic use of fire in spring or fall can maintain such openings and reduce fire hazard in and around campgrounds. pole-sized Size: 3MB. Historical fire regimes of the Blue Mountains. BMNRI-TN La Grande, OR: U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Blue Mountains Natural Resources Institute. 4 p. [] 7. Ahlstrand, Gary M. Fire history of a mixed conifer forest in Guadalupe Mountains National Park. Volatilization is known to be the major driver for significant losses of nitrogen and carbon from forest ecosystems subjected to prescribed fire reporting C losses between 6 and 48 Mg C ha − 1 and those of N between 60 to kg N ha − 1 (Belillas and Feller,Caldwell et al.,Little and Ohmann, ).

However, our study was Cited by: The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

Fire Effects Information System is an Internet data-base that contains specific information about plants from the United States and Canada (see chapter 9). The best way to learn about fire effects in a specific location is to visit areas recently burned under differ-ent fire prescriptions and fuel and soil moisture Size: 8MB.

Fire severity is the effect of the fire on the landscape, as it affects the forest floor, tree canopy and other parts of the ecosystem and can be measured by tree mortality and ground fire severity ratings [46]. We characterized fire severity in all three treatment plots with a systematic sampling scheme based on 29 - 49 grid-points per ha plot.

Fire suppression and drought have led to a significant amount of land that must be treated to reduce wildfire risk [], particularly in California, are many ecological benefits of forest residue disposal through burning [2,3], but selecting the most appropriate method is important for sustainable forest management [].Currently, piling residues is the preferred method for Author: Woongsoon Jang, Deborah S.

Page-Dumroese, Han-Sup Han. The Forest Service is adopting a cohesive strategy for fire management and forest health programs. The full text of the report, Protecting People and Sustaining Resources in Fire-Adapted Ecosystems-- A Cohesive Strategy, is set out at the end of this notice.

Effects of prescribed fire on soil nitrogen levels in a cutover Douglas-fir/western. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah): The National Fire-Danger Rating System: technical documentation.

(Ogden, Utah: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, ) (page images at HathiTrust). Fire effects on Pacific Northwest forest and range vegetation. Portland, OR: U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, Range Management and Aviation and Fire Management. 23 p. Soil compaction can result. Chipping of residues for dispersal over roads, landings and cutover areas has been suggested.

However, chipping is costly. In areas of high volume slash, chips can reach an excessive depth and thereby add to the fire hazard, reduce the availability of soil nitrogen and impede regeneration.Douglas fir regeneration is frequently favored over western hemlock on mineral soil, particularly in the hotter, drier areas of the zone.

Major forest species are Douglas fir, western hemlock, western red cedar, grand fir, Sitka spruce (near the ocean) and western white pine in random locations.This banner text can have markup.

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